Constitution’s Week in Review – 27 August 2016

Article 1, Section 2.  Apportionment

The original Constitution set Congressional representation at 1 Representative for every 30,000 persons.[1]  If this formula had remained in effect, the House of Representatives would today contain over 10,000 members.

What would have been the original first amendment had it been ratified in 1791 would have gradually increased the apportionment formula until it reached 1 Representative for each 50,000 persons.  Even at 1 to 50,000, the House would today contain about 6400 members.[2]

Back when communication was somewhat less than globally instantaneous, and telepresence still a science fiction, a legislative body of these proportions seemed unmanageable, and so the Reapportionment Act of 1929 was passed which capped the number of Representatives at 435.  In 1929, when the U.S. population stood at 121.8 Million, this meant each Representative must represent 280,000 persons.  Today, the average Representative must represent the interests of 750,000 individuals.  Good luck with that.

Providing the basis for this apportionment was an enumeration or census, to be conducted every 10 years:

“The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct.”

Our country’s first official census was conducted in 1790[3] and the last in 2010.[4]  The 2020 census is beginning to come onto political radar screens and looks to be as controversial as any previous.  What should be a simple counting project has proven to be anything but.

Certain elements of the U.S. government attempt to use the census to gain additional socio-demographic information they can use to shape their programs.  This means asking census questions that go well beyond a simple “enumeration” and intrude into personal information that some feel the government has no need to know or right to demand.

With apportionment, however, comes political power — 15 states are projected to gain or lose districts as a result of the 2020 census — and that means politically-motivated groups will seek ways to influence the outcome.  It should come as no surprise then to learn that certain political groups hope to influence the 2020 census to gain political advantage.

The Open Society Foundation, founded by George Soros, is funding key progressive groups[5] with the goal of attempting to “influence appropriations for the (U.S.) Census Bureau.” while pushing to change the methods by which racial categories are counted.  One big issue: do you count incarcerated individuals as residents of the jail/prison location or are they residents of their pre-incarceration domiciles?   With U.S. prisons bursting at the seams, this becomes an important question.  Watch for more on this as we get closer to the actual census.

First Amendment. A Win for Religious Liberty?

Genesis 1:27 tells us that God created humans as either male or female.  Although biologists point to several factors involved in determining gender during conception, gender, once set, is set; the idea that someone could actually change their gender after birth is of very recent vintage.  Only advances in cosmetic surgery have made the idea even approachable.  Of course, at the genetic level the idea is preposterous.  Despite all external attempts to portray oneself as the opposite sex, chromosomes have proven more resistant to change.

But now that the issue of homosexual marriage appears to have been settled, in the eyes of many, if not most Americans, gender identity is the new battleground.  Bathroom/shower-room use in the public schools gets a lot of the attention (as a side note: a Texas Federal Judge has blocked the Department of Education’s attempt to inflict gender confusion on the nation’s schoolkids).[6]  But trans-genderism is creating other controversies as well.  For instance, must an employer accommodate an employee’s announcement of gender “transition” at face value and retain that employee in their job?

A U.S. District Judge in Michigan has decided the answer to that question is “No,”[7] the employer can not only fire such an individual, they and can base their decision on their firmly held religious values, even if the business involved is not a church or other religiously-oriented organization.  I’ve no doubt this decision will be appealed and I fully expect it to reach the Supreme Court, where, based on our Society’s emerging hostility to religion, I predict the Court will strike down the decision and state that a firing decision cannot be based on religious views of gender.  But we’ll see.

Two Wins for Religious Liberty in One Week, What’s Happening Here?

The following story shows the strength of grass-roots efforts when properly marshalled.

The California legislature was set to pass SB1146.[8] Among its provisions was one preventing low-income students from receiving Cal Grants, California’s system of need-based education aid, if they attended colleges which restrict campus bathroom use based on biological sex.  Thanks to “hundreds and hundreds of phone calls,” Senator Ricardo Lara, a Democrat  and the bill’s sponsor, agreed to remove the offending clauses.

Kudos to the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty and the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission which mobilized their members.  It can work!

Why Does the Federal Government Own So Much State Land?

In previous posts and in my seminar I complain about the extent of state land claimed by the federal government: 85% of Nevada, 70% of Alaska, 57% of Utah, and so on.  Article 4, Clause 2 gives Congress the power to “dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the United States.”  Notice the words “dispose of.”  These imply that federal territory will not be held in perpetuity, only temporarily until it is either sold off or made into a state.  Environmentalists, of course, have no problem with the federal government sequestering such land from development and keeping it as wilderness “for the people;” otherwise, cash-hungry states would just sell it off to developers, and then “good bye Yellowstone!”  Now we learn there are a considerable number of conservatives[9] who see things the same way.  Apparently willing to put aside the issue of big government, they see these lands as a “national birthright” and demand they be protected from economic development, principally by keeping them under federal ownership.  What’s a Republican platform-writer to do?

Upcoming Events:

Note for those in the Hampton Roads area: On Tuesday, 6 September, our Natural Law Discussion Group, having finished a look at Natural Law, will undertake an abridged version of Institute On The Constitution’s Duty of the Jury Course.  This course explores the traditional power of juries and how it has changed over the years.  In the colonial period and even into the 1860s, juries routinely exercised the power to judge both the law and the facts.  Not so much today; primarily because juries are routinely and specifically instructed by judges that they do not have this power.  The discussion group is (and has always been) open to anyone with an interest in studying what we’re studying.  The group meets from 6:30-8:30 pm in the Oyster Point area of Newport News, VA.  For the address details, send an email to: gary@constitutionleadership.org.

12 Sep, Lessons in Liberty – The Electoral College

The functioning of the Electoral College today bears little resemblance to the Framers’ intentions.  But rather than completely eliminate the “College” with an amendment, which would be the “constitutional” thing to do, groups like National Popular Vote have decided a final end-run is all that’s needed.  Can the Framers’ intent be restored?  Come find out on Monday, 12 September, 7-9pm at the Foundation for American Christian Education in Chesapeake, VA.  For those outside the local area, the presentation will be livestreamed.  Registration is $10 either way at www.face.net.

19 Sep, Christian Financial Concepts Webinar – The Electoral College Once Again

The following Monday, I give a one-hour abbreviated version of my Electoral College presentation for the Christian Financial Concepts[10] webinar series.  Participation is free, but this will by necessity be a more truncated view of the subject.

WFYL Radio: We the People, the Constitution Matters.  Having completed a look at the principles of the Declaration of Independence, our intrepid commentators take on the topic of “Progressivism in America.”  Join us Friday mornings from 7-8am beginning 26 August, as we cover the sordid history of Progressivism, how it gained a foothold in America, the damage it has already done and where its acolytes plan to take this country given the chance after November.

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] The word “residents” is not used, however, giving rise to the question of whether representation was intended to be based on “residents,” however temporary may be their residency, or “citizens,” or some other designation.

[2] For more on ratifying the original first amendment today see: https://americaagain.net/

[3] The U.S. population in 1790 was 3,929,214.

[4] The U.S. population in 2010 was 309,300,000.

[5] http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/08/22/leaked-doc-soros-open-society-seeks-reshape-census-electoral-districts/

[6] http://patriottribune.com/44167/texas-judge-blocks-transgender/

[7] http://www.gopusa.com/?p=13949?omhide=true

[8] http://dailysignal.com/2016/08/12/what-conservatives-did-to-pull-off-religious-liberty-win-in-california/?utm_source=TDS_Email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Top5&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWmpRME5qSTRPR001TTJNdyIsInQiOiJFbE9iRSsyekZicFlMNzByTUMza2xVQzlmSm1MOTdRSEpCY3NFNU5reVBzclI2QU5hRm5KSk1SNHB0WUtTcEVIcElLZXhEcW5wMTVyMmtnZXJyZ0lST1JEdHd6QnZxWHQyR25jOUxqTGFicz0ifQ%3D%3D

[9] https://www.yahoo.com/news/conservatives-split-over-u-land-transfers-western-states-104946810–finance.html

[10] http://www.christianfinancialconcepts.com/webinars.php

 

Constitution’s Week in Review – 20 August 2016

As I watched some of the Olympics coverage this week I couldn’t help reflect on the central role “rules” play in an ordered society.  Image if two soccer teams showed up for their match and the refs announced that the rules were mere “guidelines,” that the public expected them (the refs) to “keep up with the times.” “In the end,” says the Head Ref, “the final score will be determined by how well we think each team played.”

I suspect: “Say what?” would be the mildest of the reactions from the players.

Yet the American public seems to not care much whether our government plays by the rules of the Constitution or not.  Just saying.

It Seems To Be All About The First Amendment This Week.

Can a church operate on Biblical beliefs? I wonder how many states, besides Iowa, have a “Civil Rights Commission.”  My guess is that most do.  Does your state?  If so, you might want to start monitoring it to see if its members intend to follow the lead of Iowa’s Commission (ICRC).

In 2007, the Iowa legislature expanded the state’s Civil Rights Act to make it illegal to discriminate based on sexual orientation and gender identity.  The ICRC then issued an online brochure[1] that stated churches would “sometimes” be held accountable for the guidelines.  Naturally, this caused great confusion among the state’s churches, with some charging that the ICRC was forcing gender-neutral bathrooms on them[2] and even that the ICRC intended to monitor sermons for compliance.  Those on the Left called it a non-issue.[3]  With the help of Alliance Defending Freedom, other churches filed suit to have the brochure clarified.[4]

It appears the ICRC has no intention, for now, of filing complaints against churches for failing to allow gender-confused individuals to use the bathroom of their choice or for preaching bible-based admonitions against homosexuality.  But there remains great confusion over whether churches must become “members-only” in order to be totally immune.

How’s gender-confusion being dealt with in your state?

Mosques vs Churches.  Does the First Amendment require government at every level to accommodate every religion equally?  I know what the Framers of the Constitution would have said.  We’ll soon find out what today’s courts think.

Muslims of Sterling Heights, Michigan, asked for a zoning waiver that would allow them to build a second mosque in the city, and were turned down.  Claiming bigotry, the Muslims filed suit[5] and, rather than wait for the suit to be resolved, the Obama administration jumped into the fray and launched their own investigation of the claim.

If a Christian Church had instead been denied a zoning variance for similar reasons, I doubt the result would be a lawsuit.  But the way things are going in this country, with Christians being told to “shut up and color,” I won’t be surprised to see churches being similarly restricted and reacting similarly.  But back to the central question: must government, in this case city government, treat all religions equally?  If a variance is given to one religion or denomination must it then be given to all?  Can there still be valid reasons for turning down a zoning request?  Or to avoid any hint of bias, must we allow Muslims in America to erect mosques wherever they desire?  The landscape of America is changing, and the pace of that change is quickening.  At some point Americans will have to decide whether they wish to retain some sort of a national identity.  What do you think?

What does Free Speech Include?  People often point to Canada as our “enlightened neighbor to the north.”  Sporting a nationalized healthcare (from which the wealthy flee to obtain their care in America) and a bold, brash young Prime Minister, it is easy to overlook the “dark side” of Canadian life.  Like this:  would we be comfortable in America with unelected commissioners dispensing fines when comedians’ jokes start crossing imaginary lines in the sand?

Quebec’s Human Rights Tribunal fined a Canadian comedian[6] $42,000 for joking about a disabled boy.  Unfortunately, the boy he chose to joke about really existed and was sort of a national icon; that certainly didn’t help.  But I think we can all agree that while such a joke is clearly in poor taste, we’re headed down a steep, steep slope if we start prosecuting people for poor taste.  On the bright side, the aisles of Walmart would quickly empty,[7]

That Nasty Bible Again.  Mikey Weinstein[8] of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation continues to wage his one-man crusade against Christianity in the Air Force, this time complaining about a Bible left in plain view on an Air Force Major’s desk.[9]  Official Air Force policy says Bibles on desks is acceptable, but that didn’t stop Mr. Weinstein, who hoped to capitalize on a ruling last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces which upheld the bad conduct court-martial of a Marine who displayed Bible verses on her computer workstation.  Weinstein’s complaint will fail, but I predict the publicity-hungry ex-Air Force officer (you don’t know how much it pains me to acknowledge Weinstein was such) will not be dissuaded.

Upcoming Events: It is shaping up to be a busy Fall.  I will be putting on at least one Constitution Seminar in either September or October in the Tidewater area, but the date and location are not yet certain.

On Tuesday, 6 September, our Natural Law Discussion Group, having finished a look at Natural Law, at least for the moment, will undertake an abridged version of Institute On The Constitution’s Duty of the Jury Course.  This course explores the traditional power of juries to judge both the law and the facts.  In the colonial period and even into the 1860s, juries routinely exercised this power.  Not so much today; primarily because juries are routinely and specifically instructed by judges that they do not have this power.  The discussion group is (and has always been) open to anyone with an interest in studying what we’re studying.  The next bi-monthly meeting will be 6 September from 6:30-8:30 pm in the Oyster Point area of Newport News, VA.  For the exact address, send an email to: gary@constitutionleadership.org.

12 Sep Lessons in Liberty – The Electoral College

The functioning of the Electoral College today bears little resemblance to the Framers’ intentions.  Rather than complete its death blow with a Constitutional Amendment, groups like National Popular Vote have decided a final end-run is all that’s needed.  Can the Framers’ intent be restored?  Come find out on Monday, 12 September, 7-9pm at the Foundation for American Christian Education in Chesapeake, VA.  For those outside the local area, the presentation will be livestreamed.  Registration is $10 either way at www.face.net.

19 Sep Christian Financial Concepts Webinar – The Electoral College

The following Monday, I give a one-hour abbreviated version of my Electoral College presentation for the Christian Financial Concepts[10] webinar series.  Participation is free, but this will by necessity be a more truncated view of the issues involved.

WFYL Radio: We the People, the Constitution Matters.  Having completed a look at the principles of the Declaration of Independence, our intrepid commentators take on the topic of “Progressivism in America.”  Join us Friday mornings from 7-8am beginning 26 August, as we cover the sordid history of Progressivism, how it gained a foothold in America, the damage it has already done and where its acolytes plan to take this country in the very near future.

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] http://www.christianpost.com/news/churches-sex-segregated-bathrooms-transgender-feel-unwelcome-closed-to-public-iowa-commission-166167/

[2] http://thefederalist.com/2016/07/06/iowa-bureaucrats-force-trans-bathrooms-on-churches-forbid-non-pc-preaching/

[3] https://stream.org/iowa-civil-rights-commission-spokesperson-urges-churches-trust-wont-target-sermons-religious-practices/

[4] http://www.adfmedia.org/News/PRDetail/10015

[5] http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/macomb/2016/08/10/muslims-sue-sterling-heights-mosque/88526616/

[6] http://heatst.com/culture-wars/comedian-fined-42000-for-telling-a-joke/

[7] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rj0QGecsg3Y

[8] http://www.christiannewswire.com/news/38272018.html

[9] http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/aug/18/air-force-orders-investigation-bible-officers-desk/

[10] http://www.christianfinancialconcepts.com/webinars.php

 

The Constitution’s Week in Review – 30 July 16

Meanwhile in the States, it’s all about voting:

To review: There is no natural, unalienable right to vote; instead, voting is a civil right extended by society to certain citizens, as the society sees fit.  The Constitution does not create the right, it presumes it already exists as a function of representative, republican government and only proscribes limits on voting based on “race, color, or previous condition of servitude” (15th Amendment), sex (19th Amendment), inability to pay a poll tax (24th Amendment) and a certain age range (26th Amendment).  Outside these amendments, voting requirements are a function of state law.

A Governor’s Slapdown

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe attempted to grant pardons (and thus restore voting rights) to 200,000+ Virginia felons in a brazen move to gain Democrat votes in November.  Republicans in the Virginia Assembly sued and this week won a ruling by the Virginia Supreme Court that the Governor’s move was unconstitutional, such pardons can only be extended on a case-by-case basis.  Undaunted, the Governor announced[1] that those pardons already granted under his order (some 13,000 felons had already registered to vote) would be expedited and then he would proceed to grant the rest, one-by-one.  That’s a lot of signatures.  I don’t see what Virginia Republicans can do at this point.  The liberal press, of course, painted the Court’s decision as a great travesty of justice.

A State’s Slapdown

The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals struck down North Carolina’s new Voter ID Law, ruling it was intentionally discriminatory[2] and reversing a District Court that had sustained it.  With echoes of Justice Scalia, the Appeals court said: “In holding that the legislature did not enact the challenged provisions with discriminatory intent, the [District] court seems to have missed the forest in carefully surveying the many trees.”

Here’s what happened:  In 2013, the day after the U.S. Supreme Court removed the requirement for certain states to get pre-clearance by the Justice Department for any new voting laws (in Shelby County v. Holder), the Republican leader of the NC Legislature announced he would propose an “omnibus” bill to simplify the state’s voter ID law.  The new law[3] removed many types of IDs from the “acceptable” list (along with making some other changes).  The types of ID allowed under the new bill included:

  1. A North Carolina driver’s license, including a learner’s permit or a provisional license.
  2. A special identification card issued to non-drivers.
  3. A United States passport.
  4. A United States military identification card.
  5. A Veterans Identification Card.
  6. A tribal enrollment card issued by a federally recognized tribe or a tribe recognized by NC.
  7. A driver’s license or non-operators identification card issued by another state, the District of Columbia, or a territory or commonwealth of the United States (with certain restrictions).

Despite these multiple options of ID, the Appeals Court found that African-Americans disproportionately lacked IDs on the new list and thus were disproportionately denied access to the polls.  Apparently, there could have been no other motive of the legislature in enacting the law than voter discrimination.  In reaching its decision the Court placed great weight on the types of historical voting data the legislature requested as they crafted and passed the new bill; circumstantial evidence at best.

To give an idea of the significance of this case, read the list of organizations and states submitting amici briefs on both sides.  If this ruling is not appealed to the Supreme Court and overturned it will certainly open up challenges of similar Voter ID laws in other states.

As you can see in this article,[4] there are other challenges to Voter ID laws underway in other states, all timed to be complete before November.  North Carolina was a key swing state that a candidate hoping to attain the Presidency simply must win.  Texas (Veasey v. Abbott)[5] is as well.  I’ll let you draw your own conclusions.

The two voter-related decisions featured today (VA and NC) both rested on politically appointed judges; in the Virginia case a judge appointed by the Republican-controlled Assembly cast the decisive vote; in the 4th Circuit it was federal judges appointed by President Obama that made the difference.

As I’ve said before and will say again, the election in November will decide the fate of liberty in this country for the next 30 years; somewhere from 2 to 4 Supreme Court Justices will be replaced by the next President.  To quote Senator Lindsey Graham: “elections have consequences.”  If you intend to sit this one out, think again.

Here’s a well-written essay by Richard Epstein of the Hoover Institute[6] which takes on the question: “Are Voter ID Laws Racist?”  Epstein discusses a lot of the relevant Supreme Court decisions. His focus is the 5th Circuit’s decision in Veasey v. Abbott.  He forecasts: “[i]f Veasey survives [on appeal to the Supreme Court], it will be exceedingly difficult for any photo ID law to pass muster in the United States, at least in the absence of heavily documented instances of fraud, and perhaps not even then.

What can you do?  If you are concerned about opportunities for voter fraud, if you wish to keep voting as a privilege of citizenship and believe the concept “one-man(or woman)-one-vote” has value, then you best sit down with your state Senator and or Delegate and express your view.  Make no mistake, there are people and groups in this country who believe removing any and all restrictions on voting is the key to winning elections.

Secession Anyone?

On Friday, 29 July, on “We the People,” we discussed the portion of the Declaration where Jefferson complains that appeals to the British people, accompanying those sent to the British government, went unanswered, ignored.  In his original draft of the Declaration (the sentence didn’t make the cut) he implies that the British citizens should have tried to unseat or otherwise remove those members of Parliament who were causing the colonies the most trouble.  Instead the voters returned them to office.  In my comments, I pointed to contemporary complaints from all around the U.S. over the leadership by certain Republicans in Congress, yet the constituents of these gentlemen keep returning them in office as well.   History repeats itself, particularly if you ignore it.  At what point do you stop warning your fellow citizens and just go for the separation, vis-à-vis 1776?

Jefferson points out the principle:  a people contemplating separation from their government have a responsibility to communicate their frustrations and complaints to that government as well as to the general public.

This agrees with the guidance found in Matthew 18 (which Pastor David Whitney mentioned on the show) concerning the handling of complaints; we have a responsibility to communicate our grievances in an increasingly more public way.

Thus I’m waiting with baited breath to hear the complaints of the people of Texas, California and other states talking of seceding from the Union, their efforts have been invigorated by the successful BREXIT vote.

An article this week in Fortune magazine[7] outlines some of the more prominent secessionist movements, surprisingly found in states as diverse as California and Texas, Alaska and Vermont.  If Clinton wins in November, the movements in Alaska and Texas will probably grow in strength, while if Trump wins, it will be movements in California and Vermont that benefit.  The article cites Texas v. White where the Court ruled that a state couldn’t unilaterally leave the union, while hinting that a “negotiated” secession would be viewed as constitutional.

What do you think?  Can there come a point where continuing to remain part of the Union becomes untenable?  Can a state or even a portion of a state secede, or did the Civil War settle that question?  I’d love to hear from my readers on that question.  Leave comments on Fairfax Free Citizen or send me an email.

Recommendations and Events:

Book Recommendation – “American Underdog,” by Congressman Dave Brat

Those fed up with establishment politics will find the recounting of Congressman Dave Brat’s upset victory over House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the 2014 election edifying.  And although the retelling of his come-from-behind victory makes interesting reading, the greater value of his book is not just in seeing that the people of Virginia’s Seventh District were able to “buck the machine” and send someone to Washington, but that Brat understands and respects the principles that made America successful as a nation.  Those can be organized into three categories: our Judeo-Christian tradition and all it entails,  the rule of law/constiutionalism, and free market economics.

I’ve been taking the time on my radio show to discuss the numerous principles we find in the Declaration of Independence and, before that, in a series on “American’s Fundamental Principles,” because I truly believe that the mess we find our country in today is largely if not completely the result of ignoring those principles.  If I’m right, true reform and prosperity will only come through re-incorporation of those principles into the way we run our governments, at all levels.  Congressman Dave Brat agrees.

But how do you do that without completely upsetting the apple cart?  How do you restore these principles to full operability?  Ah, there’s the rub.  But Brat has a plan, and a scant twelve years to make it work (he has pledged to be a 6-term Congressman, no more).  Get the book and see what he has in mind.

 We The People – The Constitution Matters Radio Show.

On Friday, 5 August, Pastor David Whitney will host “We the People – the Constitution Matters” as I recover from some surgery.  The scheduled topic is the phrase in the Declaration which reads: “Appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions…”  I hate to miss that one, but I’m confident David and Phil will cover the ground admirably.  Perhaps I’ll call in if I feel well enough  Please join the discussion by browsing to www.1180wfyl.com  (Friday, 7-8am EDT). If you miss the recorded show, aim for the re-broadcast Saturday at 11am or Sunday at 2pm, or download the podcast at leisure.

Lessons in Liberty – Preserving America’s Religious Liberty.

On August 18th, the Foundation for American Christian Education’s Lessons in Liberty series will play host to Mrs. Victoria Cobb, President of the Family Foundation of Virginia, located in Richmond, Virginia.  Victoria will speak on “How We Can Preserve America’s Religious Liberty.”  How do Christians navigate a world trying to redefine marriage and even gender?  Victoria will discuss how we got to where we are and how she believes Christians should respond.  The event, as all Lessons in Liberty presentations, will be livestreamed. Registration and cost information can be found on the FACE website at www.face.net.

 Lessons in Liberty – Preserving America’s Religious Liberty.

Looking ahead a bit further, on Monday, 12 September, I’ll be the Lessons in Liberty presenter, speaking on: “The Genius of the Electoral College.”  More details later.

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] http://townhall.com/tipsheet/mattvespa/2016/07/24/mcauliffe-to-circumvent-va-supreme-court-ruling-on-felon-voter-rights-will-issue-200000-clemency-grants-n2196994

[2] http://www.ca4.uscourts.gov/Opinions/Published/161468.P.pdf

[3] http://www.ncleg.net/EnactedLegislation/SessionLaws/PDF/2013-2014/SL2013-381.pdf

[4] http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1116329745763&ca=d2a2bff2-b8a8-46ee-9240-f49798745a55

[5] http://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/opinions%5Cpub%5C14/14-41127-CV1.pdf

[6] http://www.hoover.org/research/are-voter-id-laws-racist

[7] http://fortune.com/2016/07/25/us-state-secession-brexit-election/

The Constitution’s Week in Review – 23 July 16

Article 1 – The Legislature: Apportioned Representation

I discussed on my radio show not too long ago and in these pages the fact that there is at least one proposed Constitutional Amendment floating around out there without a time limit for ratification.  Just as the original 2nd Amendment became, 200 years later, our 27th Amendment, so could the original 1st Amendment become our 28th.  David Zuniga, of America Again.net is proposing we ratify that old amendment and begin restoring truly representative government to America.  Communications technology has advanced to the point where it is feasible to have telepresence meetings of thousands of participants.  Imaging only having to drive a few minutes to sit down with your Congressman in a district office, instead of communicating with them in a distant Washington, D.C. office.

Well, I was investigating a Quora question recently when I chanced upon this article[1] from a few years ago which argues that the original First Amendment was indeed ratified by the requisite number of the states back in 1789.  Evidence came to light recently that both Connecticut and Kentucky may have ratified the Amendment but failed to send their ratification instrument to Congress and thus their ratification was never recorded.

What would this Amendment do if put into effect?  It would permit the ratio of representation in America to change from the average of 1 to 750,000 residents to 1 to 50,000 residents.  The House of Representatives could grow to around 6400 members.

Congress would have to revoke the Congressional Reapportionment Act of 1929 that set the current limit at 435 Representatives, but that is a simple (?) legislative process.

The discoverer of the lost documents, Frederick John LaVergne, has taken his case to court and lost, so it is likely the original ratifications will never be judged sufficient, but that does not prevent the Amendment from being ratified today by the additional states needed to bring the total to 38, as college student Gregory Watson discovered with the original 2nd Amendment in the late 1980s.

One complaint I have with the linked article is that the version they cite of what is commonly called the Congressional Apportionment Amendment (originally titled Article the First) is not the final version passed by the joint houses of Congress but rather the version passed in the House alone, as this Wikipedia article[2] makes clear.  The substitution in the final version of the word “more” for the word “less” changes the effect substantially, but not fatally.

According to the linked article, an opinion piece published in 2010 in the New York Times complained that “Americans today are numerically the worst-represented group of citizens in the country’s history.”

You can’t argue with the math, but what do you think of the proposed solution?  How about chatting with your representative and see what he or she thinks?

Article 2 – The Executive: The Candidates and the Constitution

On Friday, we had a great discussion of character as it relates to Presidential candidates.  The show gets rebroadcast on Sunday, 24 July at 2pm and I expect the podcast to be posted sometime Monday on the station’s podcast page.[3]

Article 3 – The Judiciary

Sometimes the decisions of courts seem to defy logic.  Usually this is due to the abject politicization of judges.  It would appear that a federal judge in Michigan succumbed to this common ailment.[4]  Michigan had been one of only ten states that offered citizens the opportunity to vote for a straight partisan ticket, i.e. mark their ballet with a single stroke to record a vote for all Democrat or Republican candidates in a particular election.  In my view, this panders to those too ignorant or lazy to walk into a polling station informed of the candidates, their respective parties, and the issues at stake.

The Michigan legislature passed and Governor Synder signed into law a measure striking down this feature of Michigan balloting, but U.S. District Court Judge Gershwin A. Drain ruled instead this would place a “disproportionate burden on African Americans’ right to vote.”  Right.  That says more about African American voters in Michigan than it does the legislature’s actions.

Cultural Issues in the Courts.  Here’s Focus on the Family’s latest review.[5] A new update was posted Friday.

1st Amendment – Right of Conscience

You may recall I’ve followed the plight of a Colorado baker, Jack Phillips, who was convicted of violating Colorado’s anti-discrimination laws by the Colorado Civil Rights Commission and sentenced (and his staff) to “re-education” classes.

On Friday, Phillips, with the help of Alliance Defending Freedom, petitioned the Supreme Court to hear an appeal of his case: Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission.[6]  ADF’s website[7] contains a nice synopsis of the case.

4th Amendment – Illegal Search

The government of Highland, California has decided[8] they can inspect the apartments and rental homes of the city’s landlords at will to determine their compliance with city ordinances.  Hmmm.  A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, there used to be a country where your “persons, houses, papers, and effects” were secure against warrantless search and seizure.  Perhaps no more, at least for the residents of Highland, CA.  One more reason to “Come East, young man!”

Recommendations and Events:

Christian Financial Concepts Presentation – The Constitution as Solution

Monday night, 25 July from 8-9pm EDT, I’ll be presenting a webinar on the topic of “The Constitution as a Solution to Problems.”

Few Americans take time to reflect on the fact that the Constitution was not created ab initio, it was created within a historical context.  That we have a Constitution at all illustrates that the Articles of Confederation had proven inadequate.  Although the Articles had been designed to make amendment difficult (unanimous consent was needed), in the end needed improvements proved impossible to enact.   Conditions in the thirteen states deteriorated to the point where talk of splitting the federation into three began to be heard.  Something had to be done, and the result was the Constitution of 1787.

But what exactly had been deficient about the Articles and what problems did this create?  By studying and understanding the problems created by the Articles we will better understand the solutions proposed by the Constitutional Convention to fix those problems.

What was Shay’s Rebellion and what role did it play?  Who sat down and analyzed the deficiencies in the Articles to prepare himself for the “Grand Convention?”  Did American troops really mutiny and march on Congress?  What did America’s Founding Fathers have to say during this period?  These questions and more will be answered in this exciting presentation.

Go to https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7811182755684673537 to register for this free event.

We The People – The Constitution Matters Radio Show.

On Friday, 29 July, we will discuss the next paragraph we encounter in the Declaration of Independence; here Jefferson recounts the attempts of the colonists to enlist the aid of their “Brittish Brethren,” to no avail.  If you have complaints or petitions for the government, to what extent should you make those known and should you try to enlist the help of fellow citizens?  Please join the discussion by browsing to www.1180wfyl.com  (Friday, 7-8am EDT). If you miss the recorded show, aim for the re-broadcast Saturday at 11am and Sunday at 2pm or download the podcast at leisure.

Lessons in Liberty – Preserving America’s Religious Liberty.

On August 18th, the Foundation for American Christian Education’s Lessons in Liberty series will play host to Mrs. Victoria Cobb, President of the family Foundation of Virginia, located in Richmond, Virginia.  Victoria will speak on “How We Can Preserve America’s Religious Liberty.  How do Christians navigate a world trying to redefine marriage and even gender?  Victoria will discuss how we got to where we are with these issues and how Christians should respond.  The event, as all Lessons in Liberty presentations, will be livestreamed to those who register. Registration and cost information can be found on the FACE website at www.face.net.

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/constitution/item/14223-article-the-first-is-congress-ignoring-an-amendment-ratified-by-the-states

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congressional_Apportionment_Amendment

[3] http://www.1180wfyl.com/we-the-people.html

[4] http://www.gopusa.com/?p=12881?omhide=true

[5] http://www.focusonthefamily.com/socialissues/understanding-the-issues/cultural-issues-in-the-courts-2016/cultural-issues-in-the-courts-july-2016-update?utm_campaign=Supreme+Disappointment+on+Abortion&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl_thrivingvalues

[6] http://adflegal.org/detailspages/case-details/masterpiece-cakeshop-v.-craig

[7] http://adflegal.org/detailspages/blog-details/allianceedge/2016/07/22/5-reasons-the-u.s.-supreme-court-should-agree-to-hear-christian-cake-artist-jack-phillips%27-case?sourcecode=05K30001

[8] http://www.wnd.com/2016/07/city-surrender-4th-amendment-rights-or-else/#!

The Constitution’s Week in Review – 16 July 16

Article 1 – The Legislature: Separation of Powers.

Republicans in Congress made great hoopla[1] over passage in the House on Friday of HR-4768, aka the ‘‘Separation of Powers Restoration Act of 2016.’’  The bill makes a seemingly innocuous change to Section 706 of Title 5 of the U.S. Code[2] which will give courts greater leeway in determining when executive agency actions have exceeded the scope of the legislation that Congress passed and presented to the Executive to enforce.  The relevant section of code reads (new wording inserted in brackets and bolded):

“To the extent necessary to decision and when presented, the reviewing court shall decide [de novo] all relevant questions of law, [including the] interpret[ation of all] constitutional and statutory provisions [and rules], and determine the meaning or applicability of the terms of an agency action. The reviewing court shall—

(1) compel agency action unlawfully withheld or unreasonably delayed; and

(2) hold unlawful and set aside agency action, findings, and conclusions found to be—

(A) arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in accordance with law;

(B) contrary to constitutional right, power, privilege, or immunity;

(C) in excess of statutory jurisdiction, authority, or limitations, or short of statutory right;

(D) without observance of procedure required by law;

(E) unsupported by substantial evidence in a case subject to sections 556 and 557 of this

title or otherwise reviewed on the record of an agency hearing provided by statute; or

(F) unwarranted by the facts to the extent that the facts are subject to trial de novo by

the reviewing court.”

The key words “de novo” mean that the reviewing court will not use previous court precedent to guide their decision but is charged with looking at the laws “afresh.”  The new wording also makes it clear that “rules” are what is to be reviewed, not just “statutory provisions.”

Under what is called the “Chevron Doctrine” (from the 1984 case in which it was devised), the court typically gives deference to an agency’s interpretation of its actions in implementing the provisions of a law (i.e., the agency, and not Congress, knows best).  This is indeed a terrible doctrine and HR-4768 is an attempt by Congress to essentially nullify it.

As predicted, Democrats denigrated the bill as one removing discretion from the judges and potentially delaying “life-saving” rules (gotta have a “crisis,” right?).  They also warned this could lead to “activist” judging.  Coming from a group that has relied on and benefitted greatly from activist judges since the Warren Court, this charge seems disingenuous.

In my opinion, HR-4768, while helpful, attacks the problem from the wrong direction.  Yes, Progressives have done great damage to the republic through unrestrained agency rule-making; and while the court never should have devised the “Chevron Doctrine” to start with, the true problem is executive agencies who are allowed to write rules that have the force of law – period – that is the separation of powers violation at play here.  This legislation does nothing to change that paradigm.  Instead it permits Congress to continue to write overly vague laws and allow executive agencies to “fill-in the details.”  It nearly insures that agencies will continue to do as they please, subject only to someone bringing suit in a court of law, an arduous and expensive process that will not be pursued except when Congress or the states can’t abide the political heat for doing nothing in response to a rogue agency rule.

Since Mistretta v. Smith, executive agencies have been allowed to act as a legislative body, and this Act does nothing to change that.  If someone sees more good in this than I do, please enlighten me.  In a Congress desperate to find something to be proud of, this seems to fall far, far short.  Nevertheless, I encourage you to listen to the Judiciary Committee proceedings on their website as the Committee discusses the Act: partisan politics at its best.  I applaud Chairman Goodlatte for bringing this legislation to a successful vote, but there is much more to do.  Finally, unless Congress can find a way to attach this to some piece of “must pass” legislation, I predict the President will veto it.

Article 2 – The Executive: The Candidates and the Constitution

The ACLU is supposed to be non-partisan, that comes with their 501(c)(3) status.  They even affirm that on their website.  But they slyly created a parallel 501(c)(4) organization that allows them considerably more latitude.  The ACLU’s 501(c)(4) organization has issued an analysis of the “constitutionality” of Donald Trump’s policy positions.  They even warn us: “The ACLU Is Non-Partisan, but We Have to Take Action When So Much Is at Stake.”  You can download the paper here.  As you might expect from the most liberal legal organization in America, they are not too complimentary of Mr. Trump.  Trump positions on immigration, surveillance of Muslims, torture, libel, mass surveillance and abortion are analyzed and, in their eyes, found wanting.

The ACLU’s argument against the constitutionality of Trump’s announced ban on Muslims is sophomoric at best, declaring that it violates the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, which forbids establishing a national religion or prohibiting the free exercise of religion.  Trump’s proposed ban would do neither.  There’s an even more fundamental question at stake: How the Constitution’s protections apply to people who are neither American citizens nor even resident in America remains unexplained.

The ACLU report cites Larson v. Valente, 456 U.S. 228 (1982) as justification for their opinion.  Unfortunately, Larson v. Valente focused on “whether a Minnesota statute, imposing certain registration and reporting requirements upon only those religious organizations that solicit more than fifty percent of their funds from nonmembers, discriminates against such organizations in violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.”

I note two things:  1) the ACLU has published (as yet) no similar analysis of Hillary Clinton’s policy positions (I wonder if they even intend to.  Perhaps it was in a deleted email.),  and 2) everyone should realize that what a Presidential candidate says in the run up to the election is simply, well, talk.  The President’s constitutional powers are quite limited.  Yes, nearly every President, including President Obama, has sought ways to expand that power and “rule by decree,” and yes, the American people have turned a blind eye to egregious violations of these powers in the past, but the President’s success depends more on whether the Congress and Courts go along.  Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton, whichever one takes the oath next, will find, as have all other Presidents, that their ability to get anything done depends more on their powers of persuasion than the soundness, or even constitutionality, of their policy positions.

Article 3 – The Judiciary

Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg got herself in hot water this week by breaking a cardinal rule that says justices and judges should refrain from commenting on partisan politics.  Ginsburg called Trump a “Faker” and wondered why he had not released his tax returns.  Trump fired back, suggesting the 83-year old Justice resign.  Certainly if this election were to somehow end up in the lap of the High Court, in the manner of 2000, Ginsburg would be expected to recuse herself, but probably would not. A judicial ethics code binds lower-court judges, but not Supreme Court justices; it forbids judges from endorsing or even speaking about political candidates.

Natural News[3] chalked up the Justice’s bizarre behavior (and similar incidents) as evidence of “chemo-brain” a common aliment resulting from chemotherapy, associated with Ginsburg’s 2009 bout with pancreatic cancer.

After none other than the “Gray Lady” herself, the New York Times, published a “smack-down,”[4] the Justice walked her statement back by expressing regret.[5]

The “non-politicization” of the Supreme Court is a standing joke, everyone in America realizes the court crossed that threshold a long, long time ago.  Nevertheless, what constitutes “High Crimes and Misdemeanors” remains undefined.  Did Ginsburg cross the line?

Cultural Issues in the Courts.  Here’s Focus on the Family’s latest take.[6]

1st Amendment – Right of Conscience

Apparently, quoting the Bible’s has become a “crime against humanity,” or will soon be if the Ugandan homosexual plaintiffs win their case against the American pastor who had the audacity to do so.[7]  Hopefully the American judge will not revert to or reference international law in deciding the case.

Progressives have become apoplectic over the First Amendment Defense Act , H.R.2802,[8] which “Prohibits the federal government from taking discriminatory action against a person on the basis that such person believes or acts in accordance with a religious belief or moral conviction that: (1) marriage is or should be recognized as the union of one man and one woman, or (2) sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage.”  Has your Congressman co-sponsored the bill?  Why not?

The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee held hearings on the bill this week, and several homosexuals testified that they agreed in principle that no one should be fired, as Atlanta’s fire chief was, over their personal view on this issue, they didn’t think the FADA was the right legislation to enact that protection.  “OK, you draft a bill that will do so,” is what I’d have said to the witnesses if I were the Committee Chairman.

A similar piece of legislation concerning personal views on abortion, H.R.4828, The Conscience Protection Act of 2016,[9] has passed the House In a bipartisan 245-182 vote, and now faces a tough battle in the Senate.

2nd Amendment – Is it a Right for Everyone?

Gun control fanatics will grasp at any straws to limit the possession of firearms by law-abiding citizens.  The latest comes from Illinois,[10] one of the biggest gun-grabber” states.  If you and your spouse hope to adopt a foster child in that state, prepare to give up any weapons you may own if you don’t wish to render them incapable of being used for home defense.  What will they think of next?

The problem here is that while you may have an unalienable right to “keep and bear” firearms, there is no similar unalienable right to adopt a child, that is something we’ve allowed to come under the complete control of the state.  I’m predicting that the couple will lose at the lower court level and only prevail (maybe) if the decision is appealed all the way to the Supreme Court.

Recommendations and Events:

We The People – The Constitution Matters Radio Show.

On Friday, 22 July, we will discuss these words from the Declaration of Independence: “A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.”  Which of America’s “Princes” have turned out to be unfit to be “the ruler of a free people?”  What should be our criteria in choosing a President in the future?

I invite you to browse to www.1180wfyl.com  (7-8am EDT) and then join the discussion by calling in.  If you miss the recorded show, aim for the re-broadcast Saturday at 11am and Sunday at 2pm or download the podcast at leisure.

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] https://judiciary.house.gov/press-release/goodlatte-marino-ratcliffe-applaud-passage-bill-restore-balance-branches-government/?utm_source=The+Gavel+Newsletter&utm_campaign=0b47a438e3-July_15_Newsletter7_15_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e2a6777f0f-0b47a438e3-41345745

[2] https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2011-title5/pdf/USCODE-2011-title5-partI-chap7-sec706.pdf

[3] http://www.naturalnews.com/054650_Ruth_Bader_Ginsburg_chemo_brain_Donald_Trump.html

[4] http://conservativebyte.com/2016/07/ny-times-editorial-board-smacks-down-justice-ginsburg/

[5] https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/ginsburg-expresses-regret-over-remarks-criticizing-trump/2016/07/14/f53687bc-49cc-11e6-bdb9-701687974517_story.html?wpisrc=nl_most-draw7&wpmm=1

[6] http://www.focusonthefamily.com/socialissues/understanding-the-issues/cultural-issues-in-the-courts-2016/cultural-issues-in-the-courts-july-2016-update?utm_campaign=Supreme+Disappointment+on+Abortion&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl_thrivingvalues

[7] http://www.wnd.com/2016/07/criticizing-homosexuality-now-crime-against-humanity/#!

[8] https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/2802

[9] http://www.catholicnews.com/services/englishnews/2016/us-house-members-in-bipartisan-vote-pass-conscience-protection-act.cfm

[10] http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2016/07/14/illinois-family-wants-to-adopt-foster-child-but-may-be-forced-to-give-up-their-second-amendment-rights-to-do-so/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Firewire%20Morning%20Edition%20Recurring%20v2%202016-07-15&utm_term=Firewire_Morning_Test

The Constitution’s Week in Review – 9 July 16

Article 1 – The Legislature

A few of you may not subscribe to National Review magazine.[1]  That is unfortunate because NR has some of the best contributing writers in the conservative world.  Each issue is chock-a-block full of interesting articles.  Senator Mike Lee has written a particularly fitting one in the current issue entitled: “The Incredible Shirking Congress[2] (I know, it is easy to read the title as the “Incredible Shrinking Congress” at first glance).

Lee lays out a persuasive argument that our mess in Washington is largely Congress’ fault and won’t be fixed until Congress steps up to the plate and resumes the dominant role the Founders intended them to have in the national government.  Congress writes overly vague laws and allows executive branch agencies to “fill in the details,” which the unelected bureaucrats in those agencies are more than happy to do.  Lee points out that Congress passed and President Obama signed 3,291 pages of new legislation in 2014; but that same year executive agencies issued 79,066 pages of new regulations!  Congress also has abandoned regular order in the authorization and appropriate process.  Despite the President’s desire for deficit spending, Congress must appropriate every penny spent, so the blame for our $20 Trillion in official national debt sits on Congress’ shoulders alone.  Federal programs are routinely re-appropriated which have exceeded their authorized mandate and the annual “Pig Book[3] demonstrates that millions, if not billions, of wasteful spending takes place each year.

I encourage you to read the article in full, and then purchase a copy of Senator Lee’s book: “Our Lost Constitution,”[4] which more expansively lays out the problems that must be solved to return to true constitutional order in this country.

Article 3 – The Judiciary

Cultural Issues in the Courts.  I’ve been commenting on court cases with cultural impact for quite some time.  This week I learned of a website that does essentially the same thing and perhaps even better.  So I’m going to include a link to that site[5] in all future essays and hope you take the time to read their articles.

Here’s a nice analysis[6] of the impact my favorite Justice, Clarence Thomas, has had on the Supreme Court.

1st Amendment – Right of Conscience

More “Bias” Response Groups Appear.

Another “Bias Response Group[7] springs up, this time at Skidmore College, a liberal arts college in Saratoga Springs, New York.  Joining our police and firemen as “first responders,” the groups attempt to point out the obvious: we all have biases.  I’m biased (hopefully consistently) in favor of good over evil.  That is a bias we should wish on everyone.  But the Bias Response Groups are not interested in promoting “good” bias, only calling out “bad” bias (as they define it).

It was news to me to learn that writing the phrase: “Make America Great Again” on a college whiteboard reflects a “bad” bias (rather than support for Donald Trump).  Perhaps we are intended to take from this is that support for Donald Trump himself reflects a “bad” bias.

Regardless, you can see how quickly this can, and has gotten out of hand.  I wonder whether eight years ago a Bias Response Group would have come running if “Fundamentally Transform America” was found surreptitiously written on a college whiteboard.  These are not really Bias Response Groups, as anyone can plainly see; they are “Politically Incorrect Bias Response Groups.”  And Free Speech continues its slow but inexorable death in America.

Representative John Fleming [R-LA-4] and Senator James Lankford, [R-OK] have introduced the Conscience Protection Act of 2016 (H.R.4828 in the House, S.2927 in the Senate)

These bills (and similar ones) will provide legal protection for healthcare workers and organizations that do not wish to participate in or support the abortion industry in any way.  Although there is an email floating around stating that the House bill will be voted on on Wednesday, 13 July, the current House and Senate websites show both bills still tied up in either committee or subcommittee.  Nevertheless, if you support these bills, contacting the members of the committees or your own representatives would be an appropriate way to register your support.

The Effort To Destroy Christian Doctrine Continues.

The effort to push Christianity from the public square continues unabated.  Dating sites, like ChristianMingle.com,[8] with a publically Christian focus must now grant access to homosexuals seeking relationships with their same sex[9] even if that runs counter to the organization’s firmly held biblical standards.

Freedom of conscience continues to be transformed in America.  Soon you’ll be able to think whatever you want, privately.  If you try to express certain beliefs publically, or, heaven forbid, act on them, you will find yourself on the wrong side of the law.  Even some Supreme Court Justices, such as Associate Justice Sam Alito, are becoming alarmed at the mounting anti-Christian bias in the courts.

And Christian pastors remain silent.  Nothing to see here folks, move along.  Where does your pastor stand on this?  Do they deserve your continued support?

2nd Amendment –  Where Do We Go From Here?

Dallas. The tragedy in Dallas, overshadowing the two civilian deaths at the hands of policemen that preceded it (and which may indeed have sparked it), deserves more than a passing remark.

Reactions will be predictable: from the Left: disarm the public, who have demonstrated that they can’t be trusted to resolve anger without the use of firearms; from the Right: arm everyone and prosecute groups, like Louis Farrakhan’s Nation of Islam, which advocate violence against anyone, particularly the police.  Neither of these responses addresses the root problem: racial distrust.

In the wake of Dallas, the Minnesota officer’s reaction to the innocuous movement of hands by a black man who had just told the officer he was armed, takes on a new perspective.  Why would any armed white policeman fear a routine traffic stop with a black motorist (over a broken tail light, no less) enough to fire his weapon at the slightest movement of the motorist’s hands?  Is there any better illustration of the state of race relations in this country?  We have heard repeatedly that blacks fear confrontations with white policemen, now we see there is equal fear in white policemen over confrontations with black motorists.

Certainly the nation’s policemen, in the days and weeks which follow, have reason to be cautious, on or off the job, as further shootings of policemen have demonstrated.  And just as certainly, motorists and pedestrians alike must learn to calmly and explicitly comply with an officer’s instructions, avoiding any appearance of confrontation.

These events have revealed deeply ingrained opinions, whether right or wrong, whether justified or not, about other races, which points to the urgent need for dialogue.  We have to come together, talk to one another, and try to better understand each other’s point of view, each other’s prejudices.  We have to understand how these preconceived notions were created in the first place.  And then we need to develop better methods of resolving complaints.

Our nations’ churches are the most obvious and the best place for this dialogue to occur, and no doubt some courageous pastors have already taken steps to facilitate these discussions.  But many will not; many pastors have become so fearful of offending someone, anyone, so fearful of driving away a potential contributor, that they are paralyzed by their own fear.  They will boldly preach the Gospel, but purposefully avoid addressing cultural issues.  This must stop.

Is it a “No-Fly” or a “No-Buy” List?  More information continues to dribble out about individuals unfortunate enough to share a name with a known terrorist and end up on the FBI’s infamous “No-Fly List.”[10]  It is not so much that occasional but inevitable mistakes might be made by nameless unelected bureaucrats, it is the arduous, sometimes years-long process of rectifying the situation and getting your name removed from the list.  If you don’t enjoy the political pull of a Congressman or a state elected official, good luck.  It is called the “law of unintended consequences” and it works in conjunction with the 2nd Amendment as well.

4th Amendment.

I reported on this issue barely a month ago (4 June 16); it refuses to go away.

Could someone tell me why it takes “four years, two congressional hearings, and countless pleas to the IRS and Justice Department” to convince the IRS to return property it never should have taken in the first place?[11]  Pity the poor citizen who doesn’t think to involve his Congressional representatives in staring down this out-of-control agency.

The issue is “structuring,” a term applied to depositing or withdrawing your own money from your own bank account in a way that the IRS believes is intended to avoid mandatory reporting of transactions – such reporting becomes required at the “magic” $10,000 mark.  Disregard the fact that you may be keeping transactions below $10K merely to keep your bank from having to go through the rigamarole, the time and expense, of submitting what you see as unnecessary or even unconstitutional reports.

To the IRS you’re a drug dealer, pure and simple, there could be no other reason for your behavior, so, chucking your right of due process in the dustbin, the IRS seizes your bank account, all of it, apparently so you don’t try to withdraw the money and flee the country.

I’m sure there are many fine upstanding citizens working for the IRS.  I’m equally sure are many partisan apparatchiks trying their best to use the power of their office for partisan ends.  I reported recently (18 June 16) that the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee passed a “Contempt of Congress” resolution against IRS Commissioner John Koskinen.  I suspect Speaker Paul Ryan will refuse to bring the resolution to the floor for a vote.  If you agree with the Speaker’s action, do nothing; if you feel that is shirking a duty, the Speaker’s office awaits your letter, phone call or email.

Recommendations and Events:

Constitution Seminars.

I am now scheduling Constitution Seminars for the month of October.  If you want one for your church or community group, please let me know ASAP.

Last Call: Lessons in Liberty.  On Monday, July 11, from 7:00-9:00 p.m. EDT, The Foundation for American Christian Education’s Lessons in Liberty series will welcome Jim Wallis, who will speak on the topic: Was Jesus a Socialist?  You can attend in the FACE classroom in Chesapeake, Virginia, or live online via Livestream.

The lecture will explore the divergence of both Christianity and the Jewish people from their covenantal, Hebraic roots, and will take on related questions such as: “Was the early church communal in the modern Marxist sense?” and “How about the Moses/Joshua Hebrew model, was it a republic or a theocracy?”

The cost to attend, either in the classroom or online, is $10.  Register at http://www.face.net/.

We The People – The Constitution Matters Radio Show.

 

On Friday, 15 July, we will discuss the principle of “petitioning the government for a redress of grievances.”  This principle, mentioned in the Declaration of Independence, had a long history in English law and the colonists felt a moral obligation to use it before claiming the right of separation.  Parliament and the King ignored their petitions and forced both sides into a costly war.  In 1789, James Madison ensured we would continue to enjoy the right by securing it in the First Amendment.

 

I invite you to browse to www.1180wfyl.com  (7-8am EDT) and then join the discussion by calling in.  If you miss the recorded show, it is re-broadcast each Saturday at 11am and Sunday at 2pm.

 

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine

[2] https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2016-07-11-0100/legislative-judicial-branch-powers-warped

[3] http://www.cagw.org/reporting/pig-book

[4] https://www.amazon.com/Our-Lost-Constitution-Subversion-Americas/dp/159184777X

[5] http://www.focusonthefamily.com/socialissues/understanding-the-issues/cultural-issues-in-the-courts-2016/cultural-issues-in-the-courts-july-2016-update?utm_campaign=Supreme+Disappointment+on+Abortion&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl_thrivingvalues

[6] http://dailysignal.com/2016/07/01/25-years-later-clarence-thomas-transformed-supreme-court/?utm_source=TDS_Email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Top5&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWXpGalpUSm1aVEE0TUdSaSIsInQiOiJMVmZNMk12VktHM3hjVHI5Um1CZ1JUb3RjMVhKRnBteUtHb0xtYko4WDRMdXZaOVhweGwrWWs1NG4xXC85ZXFoblZKR29iRWlpSmoyM2hSRFc0MWlxbzY4XC82U1ZrN3o0R2loSEpkdGpYSjM0PSJ9

[7] http://eaglerising.com/34732/read-the-messages-left-on-college-whiteboards-that-were-deemed-to-be-racialized-targeted-attacks/

[8] https://www.christianmingle.com/

[9] http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2016/07/03/several-faith-based-dating-sites-now-required-to-allow-users-to-search-for-same-sex-matches/324760/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Firewire%20Morning%20Edition%20Recurring%20v2%202016-07-04&utm_term=Firewire_Morning_Test

[10] http://dailysignal.com/2016/07/03/fbi-flagged-this-congressman-as-a-terrorist-why-he-opposes-a-new-gun-ban/?utm_source=TDS_Email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MorningBell&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWm1VNVpHSTVPVFF5T0dNMSIsInQiOiJPclV2b0NDSXJSbTZtT2IwOWRxRWpTSDRidmxXSW1JTFNsOFJ6NFwvbXFSMVwveWh2aGZPTFwvSkQ5WklZVFk4clptRXoxUWdhRkp3RVwvYTd1RDloZVlPZ2E2REszMExFMm56WnpwTllHb3liWGs9In0%3D

[11] http://dailysignal.com/2016/06/29/irs-to-return-30k-it-seized-from-maryland-dairy-farmers/?utm_source=TDS_Email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Top5&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWXpGalpUSm1aVEE0TUdSaSIsInQiOiJMVmZNMk12VktHM3hjVHI5Um1CZ1JUb3RjMVhKRnBteUtHb0xtYko4WDRMdXZaOVhweGwrWWs1NG4xXC85ZXFoblZKR29iRWlpSmoyM2hSRFc0MWlxbzY4XC82U1ZrN3o0R2loSEpkdGpYSjM0PSJ9

The Constitution’s Week in Review – 2 July 16

Happy Birthday America!

Most people associate July 4th with our nation’s “birth” (the day was declared a national holiday after all), overlooking the fact (or perhaps they’ve never been taught) that it was two days earlier, on July 2nd, when the Continental Congress actually voted to pass Virginia’s resolution calling for independence.  Writing the next day to Abigail, John Adams gushed:

“The Second Day of July 1776 will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America.  I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival.  It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty.  It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires, and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.”

The day after Adams wrote those words, the draft of the Declaration was “wordsmithed” and finally approved, leading to our national holiday being recognized on that day instead.  The story of the passing of Lee’s resolution is full of drama and intrigue.  Enjoy the read.[1]

While it is fitting and proper to wish the nation a “happy birthday,” it is also fitting and proper to note the precarious situation the country finds itself in.  Immense challenges: economic, cultural and constitutional, threaten our future prosperity and freedoms.

Take time to celebrate – and then get back to work reversing the wounding of our great nation that has taken place over the last eight years.

Article 3 – The Judiciary

Showing us in vivid detail the value of term limits for federal judges, Judge Richard Posner of the 7th Circuit declared study of the original Constitution to be a complete waste of time,[2] at least for judges: “I see absolutely no value to a judge of spending decades, years, months, weeks, day, hours, minutes, or seconds studying the Constitution, the history of its enactment, its amendments, and its implementation,” waxed the jurist, who was appointed to the bench in 1981 by President Ronald Reagan (who probably regrets the appointment).   I agree in part with the judge, however.  The Supreme Court has indeed turned the Constitution into a system of common law, judge-made law, departing from the idea of a fixed standard of law, to be modified only by “amendment in the way which the Constitution designates.”[3]

The judge’s amazing statement joins a host of equally controversial ones in the past that make it unlikely (in the eyes of some at least) that the judge would ever be nominated to the Supreme Court.  Condemning Justice Antonin Scalia for making politically charged public statements[4] while doing the same hardly enlarges one’s credibility.  So, since Congress seems unwilling to propose a term limits amendment, even one focused exclusively on jurists, and since the Article V Convention project is still being rabidly fought by some on the Right, it appears unlikely that we will ever have access to a mechanism for removing jurists whose opinions make them unsuitable for continued service.  Oh well.

1st Amendment – Right of Conscience

As I’ve hinted numerous times in these pages, if you want a chance to express your right of conscience, you best do it soon – the right may not be around much longer.

If you care to let your conscience peek out on the campus of the University of Northern Colorado, at least in some non-politically correct way, you might find yourself the subject of an inquisition by the “Bias Response Team.”[5]  At the moment, the teams seems content to merely point out apparently unperceived “bias” (translation: anything the Left does not believe in); but how long will it be before an unfavorable ruling by the “bias police” results in disciplinary action or worse for some unlucky college student?

In related news, the Mississippi state legislature’s attempt to provide some protection to their citizens to act within the limits of their conscience came screeching to a halt as  a U.S. District Judge ruled[6] that Mississippi’s House Bill 1523,[7] violated the U.S. Constitution.  The Bill was an attempt to pushback against last year’s Obergefell v. Hodges decision legalizing homosexual “marriage.”  LGBT groups applauded the ruling.

Hopefully, the ruling will be appealed but at the moment that is not certain.

So the question remains: is there any aspect of Christian faith/Christian conscience which should be allowed to inform your public actions?  What do you think?

2nd Amendment – Never Let a Shooting Go To Waste

Sensing a change in the mood of the American public over whether persons on the government’s “no-fly” list should be allowed to purchase guns, Congressional Democrats are preparing to turn their “sit-in demonstration” into a road-show.  If you are comfortable with people who find themselves, for whatever reason, on a secret government list being denied the ability to purchase a gun, than go about your business, nothing to see here.  I see potential problems.

 Recommendations and Events:

Constitution Seminars.  I have no Constitution Seminars scheduled at the moment.  If you have a group of 10 or more individuals within a day’s drive of Yorktown, Virginia, and would like one presented, let me know via email to: gary@constitutionleadership.org.   Keep in mind that I’ll be unavailable from 1 August to 18 September.

Lessons in Liberty.  On Monday, July 11, from 7:00-9:00 p.m. EDT, The Foundation for American Christian Education’s Lessons in Liberty series will welcome Jim Wallis, who will speak on the topic: Was Jesus a Socialist?  You can attend in the FACE classroom in Chesapeake, Virginia, or live online via Livestream.

This lecture explores the divergence of both Christianity and the Jewish people from their covenantal, Hebrew roots. And will take on a related questions such as, “Was the early church communal in the modern Marxist sense?” and “How about the Moses/Joshua Hebrew model, was it a republic or a theocracy?”

The cost to attend, either in the classroom or online, is $10.  Register at http://www.face.net/.

On Friday, 8 July, we’ll begin a new feature on “We the People, the Constitution Matters” that I will call, for lack of a better term: Constitutional Tennis.  Just after the break at the midpoint of each show, one of our three commentators will pose a question about the Constitution, to be answered by any caller who knows the answer.  The first caller to answer the question correctly will be allowed, in turn, to pose a question of their own to any of our commentators.  If the question can’t be answered on the spot that commentator will be assigned the task of researching and answering the question at the start of the following week’s show.  “Team Listener” will get a point for each correctly answered question and “Team Scholar” will get a point for each on-the-spot question answered correctly.  We’ll announce the running point total each week.

You can listen to “We the People, the Constitution Matters” at www.1180wfyl.com each Friday from 7-8am EDT.  The recorded show is also re-broadcast each Saturday at 11am and Sunday at 2pm.

On 8 July, we’ll resume our continuing discussion of the principles of the Declaration of Independence by examining the principle that a “long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evince[ing] a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism” is a necessary precondition for a people to legitimately change their form of government.   We will also contrast what comprised that “long train” in 1776, with what we are experiencing today.  It should be an interesting comparison.

[1] http://udspace.udel.edu/bitstream/handle/19716/4467/article3.pdf;jsessionid=6CF19E9A57FD05120A914311C63B1D7C?sequence=1

[2] http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2016/06/has_richard_posner_committed_an_impeachable_offence.html

[3] George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796.

[4] http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/OTUS/supreme-court-justice-antonin-scalias-political-outbursts/story?id=16694778

[5] http://www.gopusa.com/?p=11819?omhide=true

[6] https://mississippitoday.org/2016/06/30/federal-judge-strikes-down-house-bill-1523/

[7] http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us/documents/2016/html/HB/1500-1599/HB1523SG.htm

The Constitution’s Week in Review – 25 June 16

Article 1, Section 5, Clause 2: Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings

Our Infantile Congressmen (some of them at least)

House Rule XXIII: “A Member, Delegate, Resident Commissioner, officer, or employee of the House shall behave at all times in a manner that shall reflect creditably on the House.”[1]

Democrats, upset at not being allowed to vote on gun control legislation they have proposed, threw a childish temper tantrum[2] on Wednesday by “occupying” the floor of the House.  Taking their cue from the Occupy Wall Street and Black Lives Matter movements, the Congressmen and women attempted to shut down House business and were ruled out of order.  I suspect they will not be censured for their violation of rules of decorum.

Article 3 – The Judiciary

On Thursday, the Supreme Court announced opinions in five cases.

In what was described as a “crushing blow” to the Obama administration, the court’s 4-4 opinion in United States v. Texas left intact a lower court ruling that the Obama administration had exceeded its authority in deferring the deportation of millions of illegal immigrants.[3]  Scalia’s vote would have made this 5-4, with the same immediate result, although the tie vote allows the court to revisit the decision after they fill the empty seat.

The Court affirmed the lower court in Fisher v. University of Texas at AustinThis allows the University of Texas to continue discriminating against qualified applicants in the name of diversity without having to demonstrate whether that diversity is needed or has improved the educational experience.  Interestingly, when I heard the decision announced on the radio driving around town Thursday there was great confusion over whether Justice Kagan had recused herself; some thought she had, some that she had not.  The 4-3 decision reveals she did, in fact, recuse herself and SCOTUSBlog confirms.  Kagan’s vote would almost certainly have made it 5-3 with the same result.  Scalia would have brought it up to 5-4 but that would not have changed things.

In three related cases,[4] the Justices ruled that imposing criminal penalties for refusing to take a breath test when suspected of drunk driving is OK but that criminal penalties for failing to take a blood test violate the Constitution.  I’ve not yet had time to read the decisions to see what logic produced the different results, but I suspect the intrusive nature of the blood test over the largely non-intrusive breath test was the discriminator.

1st Amendment – Right of Conscience

We experienced an amazing four-day mini-course at the Foundation for American Education this week as Dr. Gai Ferdon of Liberty University spoke on “The Welfare State – $20 Trillion Later.”  I anticipate FACE will make recordings of the four sessions available in the near future, and you should consider purchasing after-the-fact access.  Dr. Ferdon, covered all the history and the principles of good government that have been violated over the years as the U.S. has moved inexorably to The Welfare State.  A related topic, covered on the last night, is the wholesale violation of Right of Conscience. Right of Conscience is supposedly secured by the First Amendment and Dr. Ferdon took us through some of the arguments that helped shape the exposition of the right during the Founding Period.

Right of Conscience is dying a slow death in this country, as I discussed on my radio show this morning (the podcast should be up on Monday or you can listen to a re-broadcast on Saturday (11:00 am) or Sunday (2:00pm).  Now comes news that California (who’d have guessed?) is requiring churches to pay for abortions[5] for staff members.

2nd Amendment – Never Let a Shooting Go To Waste

The Supreme Court rejected an opportunity[6] to address a state “assault gun” ban, leaving New York’s and Connecticut’s onerous bans in place.  This was most likely done because Chief Justice Roberts foresaw an expected 4-4 tie that would have left the lower court ruling in place.

The quest for a “compromise” bill to prohibit the purchase of guns by those on the No fly List continued this week with Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) introducing a supposedly “bi-partisan” bill[7].  Question: was Omar Mateen on the nation’s No-fly List?  I’ve not seen anything that suggests he was, so this is just one more attempt at gun control unrelated to recent incidents.  The linked article contains a point-by-point rebuttal of the features of Collins’ bill.

Recommendations:

Constitution Seminars.  I have no Constitution Seminars scheduled at the moment.  If you have a group of 10 or more individuals within a day’s drive of Yorktown, Virginia, and would like one presented, let me know via email to: gary@constitutionleadership.org.   Keep in mind that I’ll be unavailable from 1 August to 18 September.

Lessons in Liberty.  On Monday, July 11, from 7:00-9:00 p.m. EDT, The Foundation for American Christian Education’s Lessons in Liberty series will welcome Jim Wallis, who will speak on the topic: Was Jesus a Socialist?  You can attend in the FACE classroom in Chesapeake, Virginia, or live online via Livestream.

This lecture explores the divergence of both Christianity and the Jewish people from their covenantal, Hebrew roots. And will take on a related questions such as, “Was the early church communal in the modern Marxist sense?” and “How about the Moses/Joshua Hebrew model, was it a republic or a theocracy?”

The cost to attend, either in the classroom or online, is $10.  Register at http://www.face.net/.

STAND Awakening Conference.  Those of you who live in the Tidewater area should try not to miss the STAND Awakening Conference, 1-3 Jul,y here in Chesapeake, VA.  I’ll see you there.

We the People – The Constitution Matters.  On July 1st, I’ll be interviewing Denver, Colorado lawyer and author Jenna Ellis about her recent book: The Legal Basis for a Moral Constitution.  In the book, Jenna lays out a rock-solid case that the Constitution is a moral document and must be interpreted as such.   You can listen to the pre-recorded interview at www.1180wfyl.com on Friday from 7-8am EDT.  On 8 July, we’ll resume our discussion of the principles of the Declaration of Independence.

 

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] Rules of the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, January 6, 2015.

[2] http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/dems-shut-down-house-floor-to-protest-for-gun-control/article/2594589

[3] http://kfor.com/2016/06/23/supreme-court-announces-split-decision-on-controversial-immigration-programs/

[4] Birchfield v. North Dakota, Bernard v. Minnesota, and Beylund v. Levi

[5] http://www.lifenews.com/2016/06/21/obama-administration-forces-california-churches-to-pay-for-abortions

[6] http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-court-guns-idUSKCN0Z61JE

[7] http://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepavlich/2016/06/22/the-susan-collins-gun-control-bill-is-a-nightmare-for-innocent-americans-n2182134

The Constitution’s Week in Review – 18 June 16

Article 2 – Impeachment

We traditionally link impeachment to the Presidency, for good reason: impeachment is discussed in the Constitution in Article 2, which covers the Executive Branch, and we have indeed impeached two presidents (and almost a third).  But over the years we’ve impeached far more lesser officials, nearly all judges and justices.

Calls to impeach IRS Commissioner John Koskinen appear to have petered out, but there remains an effort to censure the man for his agency’s abuse of power and his obfuscation in the face of Congress’ attempts to investigate that abuse.

On 15 June, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee voted on a censure resolution of Koskinen.[1]  The committee passed the resolution (HR 737) out of committee (23-15) to the full House for a vote.

 1st Amendment – Free Speech and Right of Conscience

Climate change proponents are becoming increasingly apoplectic when they encounter individuals (or companies) who would rather believe the science than the hysteria.  There are increasing calls for censoring anyone who is not yet convinced that man is going to destroy all life on earth if allowed to exhale willy-nilly (I’m only exaggerating slightly).  20 Democrat Attorneys General have banded together to make thinking differently about climate change and acting on those opinions a crime.  New York, California and the Virgin Islands are taking aggressive action using RICO statutes.

Break-break. In a bit of good news, on 14 June the House passed HR 5053: Preventing IRS Abuse and Protecting Free Speech Act.  The bill amends the Internal Revenue Code to prohibit the IRS from requiring a tax-exempt organization to include in annual returns the name, address, or other identifying information of any contributor.  Its fate in the Senate is unknown.

2nd Amendment – Never Let a Shooting Go To Waste

The reaction to the Orlando shooting has predictably been focused on the guns instead of the shooter.  It appears to be a complete mystery to some on the Left why an Islamist would want to kill homosexuals (see Quran (7:80-84) and Abu Dawud (4462)).

Barack Obama[2] and then Hillary Clinton[3] called for greater restrictions or renewal of a ban on “assault weapons” (no one in their right mind would use an AR-15 semi-automatic to assault anything if there were a true assault weapon available, but gun-grabbers are not easily deterred by definitions).

Not to be outdone, Homeland Security Chief Jeh Johnson called gun control a Homeland Security issue.  “We need to do something to minimize the opportunity for terrorists to get a gun in this country.”  Fine, although I would reword it slightly to say: “We need to do something to minimize the opportunity for terrorists already in this country to get a gun.”  But then who are the terrorists and how, really, are you going to “minimize” their opportunity to obtain a gun (this presumes they don’t already have one or more already)?  Johnson then suggested that people who find themselves on no-fly lists for some reason (like Fox News contributor Stephen Hayes did a couple of years ago) should not be able to purchase a weapon.  Assuming the list contained no errors, which we know is not the case, that would make sense and it appears Republicans are going to accede to the request.  More troubling, however, was Johnson’s inclusion of “various other lists” to screen purchase requests (What lists exactly? The IRS’ list of Tea party groups?).

Meanwhile, California continues to lead the nation in disarming its citizens.  Last week the 9th Circuit ruled[4] that California counties can require people who request concealed carry permits to show a specific reason why one is needed.   The judges didn’t bother to say what reasoning should be persuasive.  Since it is illegal to open-carry a weapon, loaded or unloaded, in most parts of California, the ruling would effectively leave most Californians (but not most criminals) unable to defend themselves outside their homes.  But hey, it’s becoming easier to have food and other goods delivered right to your doorstep, so soon the problem will solve itself.

Since the 9th Circuit’s ruling conflicts with those of other Circuit Courts it is likely the Supreme Court will be called upon to eventually settle the matter.  If Obama appointee Judge Merrick Garland is sitting on the bench by that time, I predict concealed carry will be disavowed as a 2nd Amendment protection.

Finally, we encounter Rolling Stone magazine’s call to repeal the 2nd Amendment.[5]  We knew this was coming.  Once the White House configured their website to read: “The Second Amendment gives citizens a right to keep and bear arms,” I knew it was only a matter of time before we would hear calls for repeal.  So fine, repeal the 2nd Amendment, and then show me where the Constitution grants the federal government the power to “infringe” gun ownership in any way.  It does not.  But alas, I forget; we long ago abandoned a Constitution of limited and enumerated powers in favor of one that, among other things, gives the Congress the power to define “General Welfare” any way they want.  Most Americans are oblivious of this point, however, and seem content to prefer a government that can provide their every need.

Towards the end of the week came news of the shooting of a British Member of Parliament, in supposedly gun-free Britain.

If any good comes from the Orlando tragedy it might take the form of a new awareness by homosexuals of their increasing vulnerability in light of the forced immigration of Muslims who have no intent to assimilate into American culture but who instead insist that Sharia govern both their lives and ours.   It appears homosexuals are getting the message.[6]  Wake up America!

p.s. As they noted on “The Five” after the shooting, if Mateen had tried to take on a biker bar instead of a gay bar, the outcome would certainly have been different.  Have you expressed your view of the 2nd Amendment to your elected officials recently?

4th Amendment – Search and Seizure: Civil Asset Forfeiture

In an amazing “Sicilian salute” to the 4th Amendment, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol (OHP) has purchased devices[7] that can empty gift cards you happen to be carrying if they suspect you have committed some crime.  Emphasis on the word “suspect.”   Due process of law is becoming a thing of the past at least in Oklahoma.

Note at the bottom of the linked article on this issue that the company providing OHP with the devices gets 7.7% of all money seized.  Hmmm.  One Oklahoma lawmaker promises to prohibit the devices in next year’s session, but we wonder how many Oklahoma citizens will suffer warrantless seizure in the meantime.

Recommendations:  I have a couple of books written or co-written by Brion McClanahan and I share his viewpoint on much of our current political mess.  Brion offers a neat little e-book on the “Forgotten Founders,” available as a free download, at: http://www.brionmcclanahan.com/.  I also encourage you to listen to his podcast: “Episode 22: Article V and the States.”

Constitution Seminars.  I have no Constitution Seminars scheduled at the moment.  If you have a group of 10 or more individuals within a day’s drive of Yorktown, Virginia, and would like one presented, let me know via email to: gary@constitutionleadership.org.   Keep in mind that I’ll be unavailable from 1 August to 18 September.

Lessons in Liberty.  It’s not too late to sign up for the next Lessons in Liberty presentation, 20-23 June, by Dr. Gai Ferdon of Liberty University.  Dr. Ferdon will speak on the topic of “The Welfare State: $20 Trillion Dollars Later.”  Participants may attend either in the FACE classroom or online via Livestream (7-9pm EDT).  The cost for the four-day seminar is $35, but if you want to only attend 1-2 evenings registration will be $10 per night.  Register at http://www.face.net/.

STAND Awakening Conference.  I often describe Bishop E. W. Jackson as the “Energizer Bunny” of the awakening movement.  I’m glad I don’t have to keep his schedule.  He is now hosting a weekly radio show, has national conference calls a couple times each week and now is conducting a Conference[8] on 1-3 July here in Chesapeake, VA, that is chock full of good speakers.  I’ll see you there.

Principles of the Declaration.  For the next several  Friday mornings, 7-8 am EDT, we will be discussing the principles of the Declaration of Independence on my radio show: “We The People – The Constitution Matters.”  The topics for next week are the twin principles that government is formed for the simple and sole purpose of making unalienable rights secure, and that government obtains its just power to do so from the consent of the governed. You can listen live at www.1180wfyl.com.  We’d love to entertain your questions or comments on the air (610-539-8255).

 

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] https://oversight.house.gov/markup/full-committee-business-meeting-37/

[2] http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/obama-uses-orlando-terrorist-attack-to-call-for-gun-control/article/2593672

[3] http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/jun/13/hillary-clinton-calls-reinstituting-assault-weapon/

[4] http://www.gopusa.com/?p=11069?omhide=true

[5] http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/why-its-time-to-repeal-the-second-amendment-right-bear-arms-20160613%22

[6] https://pjmedia.com/trending/2016/06/16/gun-sales-soar-as-gay-community-arms-itself-in-orlando-aftermath/

[7] http://www.news9.com/story/32168555/ohp-uses-new-device-to-seize-money-used-during-the-commission-of-a-crime

[8] http://standamerica.us/

The Constitution’s Week in Review – 4 June 2016

The Declaration of Independence

Everyone who has attended my seminar can tell you that there are four documents that have been declared by Congress to be the “Organic Laws of the United States.”  They include the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.  I remind my students: it is dangerous to try to interpret the Constitution separate from the philosophy of the Declaration (and the Supreme Court would agree).  But our children in public schools are not always taught the true meaning of the Declaration and how it came to be.  Even some adults have a skewed view of the document.

To try to correct our national ignorance, at least in her state, Louisiana House Republican Valarie Hodges introduced a proposal[1] to have the state’s public school kids recite some portion of the Declaration each day after they recite the Pledge of Allegiance.  Democrats in the legislature pounced on the idea, among them Democratic Rep. Barbara Norton.  She was quoted as saying: “One thing I do know is, all men are not created equal. When I think back in 1776, July the 4th, African-Americans were slaves, and for you to bring a bill to request that our children will recite the Declaration, I think is a little bit unfair to us to ask those children to recite something that’s not the truth.”

Now, I’ve never met Rep. Norton, nor do I know how/where she was educated.  But like many Americans, she has an incomplete view of American history.  One of the casualties in the Boston Massacre was one Crispus Attucks[2] a free black man who decided to stand up for his country instead of submit to British tyranny.  Blacks fought alongside whites[3] in the Continental Army, in state militias, and in the navy.  Yes, there were black slaves in most of the southern states.  Some were given their freedom in exchange for joining the army, but most remained enslaved.  As we know, that wrong was eventually righted.

Rep. Norton has obviously never stepped back and given much thought to Jefferson’s words, studied the complete history of the Revolutionary War, nor read Jefferson’s condemnation of the slave trade[4] that was deleted from the final draft of the Declaration.  Perhaps in Rep. Norton’s eyes we are not created equal, but in God’s eyes, we are, and Jefferson knew it.

Article 2:  Abuse of Executive Power

Organized Theft by the IRS

Be careful how and when you withdraw your own money from the bank; if you do something suspicious the IRS might just swoop down and take everything you have by claiming it is “drug money.”  This blatant theft is called civil asset forfeiture based on “structuring” your deposits[5] or withdrawals to avoid mandatory reporting of those over $10,000.  So if you like your privacy and don’t think the government has any business monitoring your use of it, think again.  Thanks to our wonderful Congress and their having passed the Bank Secrecy Act[6] in 1970, you can be fined or even jailed without having done anything wrong.

Article 3:  What’s up at the Supreme Court?

Here’s a nice summary[7] of the cases the Supreme Court is yet to issue rulings on this term.  It shouldn’t be much longer before we hear about some of them.

First Amendment

Sometimes we should look outside the U.S. for trends headed our way, and this is certainly one that should concern us.  Londoners are getting arrested for their social media posts.[8]  We’ve already seen the start of censorship of social media by Facebook and others; and that’s OK, those are privately owned forums and not subject to Constitutional constraints.  But arrests based on some government officials idea of what is “hateful” is another matter entirely.  Can’t happen here?  It easily could with the wrong people in charge of our government.  Stay alert.

Fourth Amendment

Sooner or later criminals will figure out that they shouldn’t carry GPs tracking devices — opps, I mean cell phones — during planned criminal activity.  The way courts are deciding[9] on police access to cell phone location data obtained from the phone companies, it doesn’t look good for the law breaker. Of course, the police would never ask for the location information on law-abiding citizens, would they?

Meanwhile in the States:

The saga continues in Alabama over whether State Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore will be able to continue on the bench.  Based on his order for state judges to ignore the Obergefell v. Hodges opinion, Moore has been suspended while an investigation is conducted.  Rightfully miffed, Moore has sued the Alabama Judicial Inquiry Commission. It appears the JIC is operating within the Alabama State Constitution, so we’ll have to see how this sits with the federal court.

Upcoming Events:

Last Call for the Constitution Seminar in Williamsburg, VA.  Hampton Roads residents will have a final opportunity (at least this summer) to learn what their Constitution says and means by coming to a CLI Saturday Seminar on 11 June in Williamsburg, VA.  The seminar will be held from 9:00am-6:00pm at 133 Waller Mill Road, Williamsburg, Va.  Due to room size, this seminar is limited to 10 participants, but is not yet full.  Cost is $30 if registered by 7 June – $40 thereafter.  Pre-registration is required via email to: gary@constitutionleadership.org.

Lessons in Liberty.  At the Foundation for American Christian Education, the Lessons in Liberty speaker for June will be Dr. Gai Ferdon, Professor at Liberty University.  Dr. Ferdon will speak on the topic of “The Welfare State: $20 Trillion Dollars Later.”  Asked to speak on this subject, Dr. Ferdon replied that it would be an impossible task to cover in a single night, thus this event will be a four-night seminar held at the Foundation in Chesapeake, VA, from 20-23 June, 7-9pm each night.  Participants may attend either in the FACE classroom or online via Livestream.  The cost for the four-day seminar is $35 instead of the normal $10 for a single presentation.  Register at http://www.face.net/.

Besides their wonderful 90-Day Challenge,[10] Constituting America[11] sponsors an annual contest for young Americans (there’s a Seniors category as well) to create videos, Public Service Announcements and essays aimed at informing and exciting Americans about their Constitution.   Here’s a  wonderful video essay by a college student.

The “Constitution’s Week in Review” is a project of the Constitution Leadership Initiative, Inc.  To unsubscribe from future mailings by Constitution Leadership Initiative, click here.

[1] http://constitution.com/democrats-attack-declaration-independence/

[2] http://www.crispusattucksmuseum.org/crispus-attucks/

[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Americans_in_the_Revolutionary_War

[4] http://www.blackpast.org/primary/declaration-independence-and-debate-over-slavery

[5] http://patriotpost.us/articles/42907

[6] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_Secrecy_Act

[7] http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-supreme-court-major-cases-20160527-snap-story.html.

[8] http://www.vocativ.com/325190/arrests-for-social-media-posts-surge-in-london/

[9] https://theintercept.com/2016/05/31/appeals-court-delivers-devastating-blow-to-cell-phone-privacy-advocates/.

[10] http://www.constitutingamerica.org/blog/90-day-study-2016-reading-schedule/

[11] http://www.constitutingamerica.org/index.php.